Australian Film Commission
This is archived information from the website of the former Australian Film Commission (AFC), now part of Screen Australia
28 April 2017
Home News Archive Releases 2008 18 June 2008
AFC ARCHIVE CORPORATE INFORMATION NEWS ARCHIVE AFC Newsletters Archive AFC Media Release Archive FUNDING ARCHIVE CATALOGUE ARCHIVE POLICY & RESEARCH AFC ARCHIVE CORPORATE INFORMATION NEWS ARCHIVE AFC Newsletters Archive FUNDING ARCHIVE CATALOGUE ARCHIVE POLICY & RESEARCH Annual Reports AFC Publications Files Created by AFC AFC Newsletters Archive AFC Media Release Archive Approvals Programs IndiVision Regional Digital Screen Network Catalogue Archive AFC Policy Archive Annual Reports AFC Publications Files Created by AFC AFC Newsletters Archive AFC Media Release Archive Approvals Programs IndiVision Regional Digital Screen Network Catalogue Archive AFC Policy Archive

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

 
image: border
2008

Ideas offered to boost the 21st century Australian music industry at inaugural Thomas Rome lecture

18 June 2008

This evening at the National Film and Sound Archive in Canberra, former Recorded Sound Industry Executive Michael Smellie offered some fresh ideas to boost the Australian Music Industry as he delivered the inaugural Thomas Rome lecture.

In his lecture "A Sound Recording Industry in Australia", Smellie identified some familiar concerns and challenges facing the Australian Music Industry and went on to offer some key ideas to boost the industry.

Speaking before an audience of representatives of the music industry, cultural institutions and arts bodies, Smellie proposed a "whole-of-industry" approach including the establishment of a peak body for Australian music and the Government's declaration of a National Music Day as means for helping the industry move evolve.

He also suggested establishing a "digital accelerator" focused particularly on music which would generate an "Australian Silicon Valley" to stimulate innovation by the music industry in the online and digital environment and advanced a plan to integrate music education into the industry's value chain" and encouraged Australia "to stake out some intellectual property in the digital music arena".

The Thomas Rome lecture is named after Thomas Rome of Warrnambool, who made the first sound recordings in this country in 1896. It has been established by the National Film & Sound Archive as an annual lecture, providing a platform for a leading figure in the Australian Sound Recording industry to generate ideas, debate and discussion about the state of the sound industries, relevant public policy issues and the role of sound in society.

NFSA's Executive Director, Paolo Cherchi Usai said, "We want the Thomas Rome lecture to be a lively forum for open ideas and innovation about directions for the sound recording industry in Australia. Michael Smellie's ideas are a contribution to a debate that interests all involved in the future of music and cultural activity in Australia more generally."

For further information, including an audio recording and transcript of the lecture, see www.nfsa.afc.gov.au or contact Teri Calder Email: teric@avviso.com.au; phone: 0425 230 679

Media Enquiries:
Teri Calder
Ph: 0425 230 679

Email: teric@avviso.com.au

Print as PDF

PDF Document  Ideas offered to boost the 21st century Australian music industry at inaugural Thomas Rome lecture