Australian Film Commission
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20 November 2017
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1996

STRICTLY OZ' AUSTRALIAN FILM SERIES MAKES DEBUT IN LOS ANGELES

9 January 1996

The Strictly Oz: A History of Australian Film retrospective, celebrating 90 years of Australian filmmaking, opens at the UCLA Film & TV Archive in Los Angeles on January 11 and at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on February 2.
The retrospective moves to Los Angeles following a highly successful season at The Museum Of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York. The MOMA exhibition, comprising almost 100 films, was organised by Laurence Kardish, Curator of the Department of Film and Video at MOMA, and several new titles have been added for the Los Angeles season by Andrea Alsberg, Director of Programs, UCLA. Strictly Oz is presented in conjunction with the Australian Film Commission.
The UCLA event will open with a special screening of Michael Rymer's AFI Award-winning film Angel Baby and cocktail party on January 11.
Highlights of the retrospective include Charles Chauvel's Jedda (1955), Raymond Longford's The Sentimental Bloke (1919) and Paulette McDonagh's The Cheaters (1930). Also included are early films by such notable filmmakers as Peter Weir, Bruce Beresford, Fred Schepisi, Gillian Armstrong and George Miller; as well as the first features by such recent filmmakers as Jane Campion and Jocelyn Moorhouse. Several films never seen before in the United States will be presented.
Strictly Oz: A History of Australian Film will be at UCLA until March 14 and at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art until February 24.
"I am delighted with the success of the retrospective at MOMA and am confident that it will be just as well received in Los Angeles. This once again affirms the growing stature of the Australian film industry in the United States and around the world," says Cathy Robinson, Chief Executive of the Australian Film Commission.

Media Enquiries:
Tracey Mair
TM Publicity
For the Australian Film Commission
Ph: 0419 221 493
Email: traceym@tmpublicity.com

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